American Culture Idioms, Expressions, Vocabulary

Doggos and Floofs: How the Internet Changes English

September 18, 2018
 © photo by Jamie Street (Pixabay)

Languages change and evolve. Think about the words in your native language that are considered “old fashioned,” or some trendy slang words that only teenagers use. With the internet, languages seem to change faster than ever. The internet has given us many new words, phrases, and slang, but some of the funniest are the words that are now associated with dogs. Get ready: you’re about to have a strange lesson in dog vocabulary and internet memes!

Doggos and Floofs: How the Internet Changes English (and Words for “Dog”)

The internet is a place to share news, but it’s also a place to share silly memes and photos. From this tradition of sharing animal photos, videos, and gifs comes DoggoLingo: the strange vocabulary and language created by the internet for all things related to cute dogs.

National Public Radio (NPR) wrote about this strange phenomenon in its article “Doggos Are Dogs: An Internet Language Built Around Love For The Puppers.” This article explains this language (called DoggoLingo) and explores why it’s so popular.

Here are some of the words and expressions that are part of DoggoLingo. Why do we have these words? We don’t know, and neither does NPR. For these answers, ask the internet.

DoggoLingo: Guide to Dog Vocabulary Online

13/10 (or other rating)

The Twitter account We Rate Dogs gives “ratings” to dogs. The joke with this account is that all dogs receive a rating above 10 (such as 11/10 or 13/10) for being good dogs.

Doggos and Floofs: How the Internet Changes English

Bork

Bork means bark. Dogs bark, but on the internet, when talking about barks, many people use the word bork instead. This changes the tone of the message: it shows that the person writing about the dog is silly and joking.

How did bark become bork? NPR thinks this is because bork sounds a lot like the word bark. It’s a playful synonym.

Doggos and Floofs: How the Internet Changes English

Doggo

A doggo is a dog. This word is used when talking about an adorable dog.

Why do people use the word doggo instead? We don’t know: ask the internet.

Floofs

Floofs are fluffy dogs. Why don’t we just describe these dogs as fluffy? We don’t know: ask the internet. Many things are fluffy (pillows, clouds, rabbits, cotton candy, and pancakes are a few examples) but only fluffy dogs are floofs.

Doggos and Floofs: How the Internet Changes English

Side note: dogs that are yellow/brown and fluffy? Those are golden floofs.

Doggos and Floofs: How the Internet Changes English

Good boy (boi)

A good boy (or good boi) is any good dog. Since all dogs are good dogs, then every dog is a good boy (boi).

Doggos and Floofs: How the Internet Changes English


Female dogs can be good girls, but this just doesn’t have the same effectiveness. Why? We don’t know . . . ask the internet.

Puppers

Puppers are puppies (young dogs) or just cute dogs that seem like puppies. Puppers can also be the following:

  • Pupperoos
  • Pupperonis
Doggos and Floofs: How the Internet Changes English

Basically, you can add any cute suffix to “pupper” and it’s the new name for a cute or small dog.

This post’s images are memes. Memes are a great way to learn a new language: as you can see from the examples in this post, memes often use silly slang. (And they’re funny!) What are some of your favorite memes? Share them with your classmates.

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