International Student Life Vocabulary

Health Care for IEC@DVC students + Medical/Health Care Vocabulary

February 22, 2017

Health-care-medical-vocabulary-international-students

International students often worry about getting sick while studying English in California. Not to worry: as an IEC@DVC student, you are completely covered and have access to excellent health care! IEC@DVC staff is here to help advise you if you fall ill, but this article will also explain your health care and what to do if you need to see a doctor in the U.S.

For more information, check out IEC@DVC’s documents:

Medical vocabulary

It’s important to understand medical/health care-related vocabulary before reading this article. Do you know all of these words?

Pharmacy

A pharmacy (or “drug store”) is the place where you can buy prescription or non-prescription drugs. Pharmacies are often located in larger stores, such as CVS or RiteAid.

Pharmacist

A pharmacist is the person who works in a pharmacy. He or she will advise you on how to take the medicines you need. He or she will also advise you on minor illnesses and the medicines you can take to feel better.

Over-the-counter drugs

Over-the-counter drugs (also called “non-prescription drugs”) are the medicines you can buy without a note from your doctor. You can buy these from your pharmacist or in the medicine aisle.

Prescription

A prescription is a note from your doctor that you take to the pharmacy in order to pick up your medications. Doctors or nurses can also call your prescription to a specific pharmacy so that the pharmacist knows you are coming and is ready with your prescription.

Coverage/covered

Both of these words are related to health insurance. You can say “I have coverage” or “I am covered.”

When your insurance pays for a medical procedure or medicine, it is “covered” by your health insurance. Sometimes a procedure or medicine is “fully covered” and sometimes it is “partially covered.”

Health-care-medical-vocabulary-international-students

Healthcare PPOs

A PPO is a “Preferred Provider Organization.” It is a network of doctors, specialists, and hospitals that accept the IEC@DVC insurance plan. Before making an appointment, always check with the doctor or medical facility directly to confirm that they are still a participating PPO provider.

When you visit a doctor in your PPO, you pay just the copay. If you visit a doctor outside of your PPO, then you must pay the office copay and 25% of all charges from your visit.

To find out the PPO doctors in your area, visit:

https://www.anthem.com/ca/

All participating PPO providers listed on the website are available to you for consultation and treatment.

Out-of-pocket expenses

Out-of-pocket expenses are the medical procedures or medicines not covered by your health insurance. These are common when you do not visit doctors in your PPO.

Health care copay

The copay is the payment you must make when you visit the doctor. The copay depends on your plan.

With IEC@DVC’s plan through Anthem, there is a $20 copay at a doctor’s office. There is also a $50 copay for each inpatient hospital visit.

The coinsurance for prescription drugs is 20% of the cost of the drug.

Health-care-medical-vocabulary-international-students

Dependents

Dependents are your family members who are also covered under your plan. If you are an IEC@DVC student and you have dependents that you want to register, visit this site to register your family under your plan.

Urgent care

Urgent care is where you go when you have an illness that is not life-threatening. (If you have a life-threatening illness, call 911!).

IEC@DVC’s plan through Anthem uses these Urgent Care centers:

John Muir Physician Network
2700 Grant Street, Suite 200
Concord, CA 94520
(925) 677-0515

Direct Urgent Care
3095 Telegraph Avenue
Berkeley, CA 94705
(510) 686-3621

Bay Valley Medical Group 319
Diablo Road
Danville, CA 94526
(925) 314-0260

Health-care-medical-vocabulary-international-students

Health care for IEC@DVC students

Students are often confused about when to go to the pharmacy, the doctor, or urgent care. These guidelines will help you. If you have any questions, ask an IEC@DVC staff member for help!

When visiting any doctor or pharmacist, don’t forget your ID card, which you receive shortly after becoming an IEC@DVC student.

Visiting the pharmacy (if you’re feeling a little sick)

If you’re feeling a little sick (you have a headache, a stomachache, a minor pain, or the cold or mild flu) then you should visit the pharmacy for medicine. To find a pharmacy, search for “drug store” or “pharmacy” online and see which is closest to you. Larger drug store companies are CVS, RiteAid, and Walmart. Some of them are open 24 hours a day.

Explain to the pharmacist what is wrong, and he or she will recommend an over-the-counter (non-prescription) medicine for you.

Visiting the doctor (if you’re sick)

If you’re not getting better (or if you have a more serious illness), you need to make an appointment with a doctor. But sure to make an appointment with a doctor who works in your PPO.  To find a doctor in your PPO:

1. Go to www.4studenthealth.com/iec-dvc
2. Select the school year (2016-2017)
3. Scroll down the page to the section “Use Your Insurance”
4. Click on the PPO Network icon

Visiting an urgent care center (if your illness is severe but not life-threatening)

If you must see a doctor but cannot wait to make an appointment, you can visit any of the following urgent care centers for treatment. (These are the same urgent care centers that were listed above).

John Muir Physician Network
2700 Grant Street, Suite 200
Concord, CA 94520
(925) 677-0515

Direct Urgent Care
3095 Telegraph Avenue
Berkeley, CA 94705
(510) 686-3621

Bay Valley Medical Group 319
Diablo Road
Danville, CA 94526
(925) 314-0260

Stay healthy to avoid the doctor: make sure you get plenty of exercise, lots of sleep, drink a lot of water, and eat healthy foods! What do you do to stay healthy? Tell us on Facebook!

You Might Also Like